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Interventional Cardiovascular Suite

State of the art facility providing diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for cardiac and vascular disorders

The Interventional Cardiovascular Suite in the Bon Secours Hospital Dublin is a purpose built, state of the art facility. The department provides diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for both cardiac and vascular disorders.

Information

The purpose built state of the art facility Interventional Cardiovascular Suite in the Bon Secours Hospital Dublin opened in 2011 to  provide diagnostic and therapeutic interventions for cardiac and vascular disorders.

Patients of the interventional suite may be either in-patients or day case patients depending upon the procedure.

Within the suite, the most modern Siemens imaging equipment has been installed. For the comfort of our patients, there is a large seven bedded day ward / recovery area attached to the suite all of which have cardiac monitors and a central monitoring station.

The suite provides a broad range of services which are provided by our specialist team which includes:

  • Cardiologists
  • Anesthetists
  • Vascular Surgeons
  • Interventional Radiologists
  • Radiographers
  • Nurses
  • Cardiac Physiologists
  • Allied Health Professional
  • A full service support team

Service / Condition Treated

Coronary Angiogram

A Coronary Angiogram is an invasive test to find out if there are any narrowing or blockages in your coronary arteries. The consultant will inject dye into the coronary arteries and X-ray pictures will be taken of your heart (coronary) arteries. This is how your cardiologist will see if there are any narrowing or blockages. The procedure takes approximately 15 -30 minutes.

 

SEDATION

If you are having a Coronary Angiogram you may be given the option of having intravenous sedation. The sedation is given through a cannula (small plastic tube) placed in the vein. You will feel sleepy and relaxed following the sedation but you will not be unconscious (this is not a general anaesthetic).

If you have sedation

  • You must have someone to accompany you home and remain with you for 12 hours
  • You must not drive or operate machinery for 24 hours
  • You must not consume alcohol for 24 hours
  • You should not make any vital decisions or sign any legal documents for 24 hours
  • You should not take any medication not prescribed or acknowledged by your doctor

 

POTENTIAL PROBLEMS

An angiogram is a relatively safe test and serious complications are rare. The risk depends on your overall health and your individual heart condition – your doctor will not recommend the test if they don’t feel the benefits outweigh the small risk.

 

Common risks and complications (more than 5%) inlcude:

  • Minor bruising at the puncture site.
  • Major bruising or swelling at the groin/arm puncture site.
  • Bleeding from access site.
  • Pain/discomfort at the access site

 

Rare risks and complications (less than 1% include):

  • Loss of pulse in the arm after a radial artery (arm) procedure
  • Abnormal heart rhythm that continues for a long time. This may need an electric shock to correct.
  • Surgical repair of the groin/arm puncture site or blood vessel.
  • Minor reaction to the x-ray radiation and sun burn type reactions (only in prolonged exposure)
  • Loss of kidney function due to the side effects of the x-ray dye.
  • A stroke. This can cause long term disability.
  • Heart attack.
  • An allergic reaction to the x-ray dye.
  • Need for emergency heart surgery or angioplasty (Stenting).
  • A higher lifetime risk of cancer from x-ray exposure.
  • Death as a result of this procedure is rare.
  • Infection at access site.
  • Major bleeding

 

SEEK URGENT MEDICAL ATTENTION OF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DEVELOP AFTER DISCHARGE:

  • Bleeding or swelling in your groin/wrist
  • Numbness, blueness, coldness or pain in the affected leg/wrist
  • Signs of infection, groin/wrist redness, pain, swelling, discharge, heat, raised  temperature
  • Prolonged or severe chest pain or angina symptoms

 

Coronary Angioplasty (PCI)

Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) is very similar to Cardiac Catheterisation, but takes longer to perform. A balloon/stent is inserted into the coronary artery and the balloon is inflated, opening up the narrowed artery. The balloon is deflated and removed, leaving the stent, (if used), in place. The stent remains there permanently. More than one stent can be inserted if required. (PI 43)

 

SEDATION

If you are having a PCI, you may be given the option of having intravenous sedation. The sedation is given through a cannula (small plastic tube) placed in the vein. You will feel sleepy and relaxed following the sedation but you will not be unconscious (this is not a general anaesthetic).

If you have sedation

  • You must have someone to accompany you home and remain with you for 12 hours
  • You must not drive or operate machinery for 24 hours
  • You must not consume alcohol for 24 hours
  • You should not make any vital decisions or sign any legal documents for 24 hours
  • You should not take any medication not prescribed or acknowledged by your doctor

 

POTENTIAL PROBLEMS

In recommending this procedure your doctor has balanced the benefits and risks of the procedure against the benefits and risks of not proceeding. Your doctor believes there is a overall benefit to you going ahead. This is a very complicated assessment. The risks are higher if you are having the procedure for a heart attack.

 

Common risks and complications (more than 5%) include:

  • Minor bruising at the puncture site.
  • Major bruising or swelling at the puncture site.
  • Chest discomfort during and post procedure.
  • Bleeding from access site.

 

Rare risks and complications (less than 1%) include:

  • Abnormal heart rhythm that continues for a long time. This may need an electric shock to correct.
  • A heart attack.
  • Surgical repair of the groin/arm puncture site or blood vessel.
  • The stent may suddenly close within the first month. This can cause angina or heart attack. It may be treated with another angioplasty or with surgery.
  • Loss of pulse in the arm after a radial artery (arm) procedure.
  • Emergency heart surgery due to complications with the procedure.
  • A reaction to the drugs given to prevent blood clotting.
  • Minor reaction to the x-ray dye such as hives.
  • Loss of kidney function due to the side effects of the x-ray dye.
  • A stroke. This can cause long term disability.
  • An allergic reaction to the x-ray dye.
  • A higher lifetime risk from x-ray exposure.
  • Rupture of a blood vessel requiring surgical repair and blood transfusion.
  • Skin injury from radiation causing reddening of the skin.
  • Death as a result of this procedure is rare.
  • Infection at access site.
  • Major bleeding.

 

 

 

 

Internal Cardiac Defibrillator (ICD)

An ICD is inserted with a similar procedure as a normal pacemaker.  Your cardiologist makes an incision, usually in the left shoulder/chest area, through which s/he passes one to three small leads to your heart.  The ICD checks the heartbeat for abnormal rhythms. If it senses an abnormal rhythm it sends out electrical pulses or a shock to return the heart rhythm to normal.

 

SEDATION

If you are having an Internal Cardiac Defibrillator inserted you may be given the option of having intravenous sedation. The sedation is given through a cannula (small plastic tube) placed in the vein. You will feel sleepy and relaxed following the sedation but you will not be unconscious (this is not a general anaesthetic).

If you have sedation

  • You must have someone to accompany you home and remain with you for 12 hours
  • You must not drive or operate machinery for 24 hours
  • You must not consume alcohol for 24 hours
  • You should not make any vital decisions or sign any legal documents for 24 hours
  • You should not take any medication not prescribed or acknowledged by your doctor

 

POTENTIAL PROBLEMS

Permanent pacemaker insertion is a relatively safe procedure and serious complications are rare. The risk depends on your overall health and your individual heart condition – your doctor will not recommend the test if they don’t feel the benefits outweigh the small risk.

  • Blood clots
  • Surgical site infection (redness or discharge from wound)
  • Collapsed lung (may require intervention such as a chest drain)
  • Pacemaker malfunction (ICD can misfire)
  • Internal bleeding

 

SEEK URGENT MEDICAL ATTENTION OF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DEVELOP AFTER DISCHARGE:

  • Severe pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Inflammation or redness at surgical site
  • Discharge from wound

Internal Loop Recorder Insertion / Removal

This is a device which allows irregular or unusual heart rhythms to be recorded. The Loop Recorder, also known as Patient Activated Cardiac Event Recorder, is a small device implanted under the skin, normally in the left shoulder/chest area, under local anaesthetic. Afterwards, the patient is given a hand held telemetry unit that he or she activates whenever symptoms are felt. This enables ECG (heart rhythm) recording and storage. The device can stay in place for up to 14 months and will also be removed in the Cath Lab, also under local anaesthetic. The Loop Recorder provides the Cardiologist with information to determine the correct course of treatment.

 

SEDATION

If you are coming in for the procedure you may be given the option of having intravenous sedation. Teh sedation is given through a canula (small plastic tube) placed in the vein. You will feel sleepy and relaxed following the sedation but you will not be unconscious (this is not a general anaesthetic). If you have sedation:

  • You must have someone to accompany you home and remain with you for 12 hours
  • You must not drive or operate machinery for 24 hours
  • You must not consume alcohol for 24 hours
  • You should not make any vital decisions or sign any legal documents for 24 hours
  • You should not take any medication not prescribed or acknowledged by your doctor

 

POTENTIAL PROBLEMS

Loop recorder insertion is a relatively safe procedure and serious complications are rare. The risk depends on your overall health and your individual heart condition – your doctor will not recommend the test if they don’t feel the benefits outweigh the small risk.

  • Blood clots
  • Surgical site infection (redness or discharge from wound)
  • Bleeding from site
  • Hematoma (swelling at the site)

 

SEEK URGENT MEDICAL ATTENTION IF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DEVELOP AFTER DISCHARGE

  • Severe pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Inflammation of redness at surgical site
  • Discharge from wound

Permanent Pacemaker

A Pacemaker is a device which stimulates your heart to beat when your heart is beating below a certain rate. Your cardiologist makes an incision, usually in the left shoulder/chest area, through which s/he passes one to three small leads to your heart. These leads are then connected securely to the Pacemaker. This is how the Pacemaker sends the impulses to your heart. The Pacemaker will automatically detect when your heart is beating below a certain rate and will then pace the heart at a pre-determined rate. A biventricular paces both the right and left ventricles which improves cardiac output.

 

SEDATION

If you are having a Permanent Pacemaker inserted you may be given the option of having intravenous sedation. The sedation is given through a cannula (small plastic tube) placed in the vein. You will feel sleepy and relaxed following the sedation but you will not be unconscious (this is not a general anaesthetic).

If you have sedation

  • You must have someone to accompany you home and remain with you for 12 hours
  • You must not drive or operate machinery for 24 hours
  • You must not consume alcohol for 24 hours
  • You should not make any vital decisions or sign any legal documents for 24 hours
  • You should not take any medication not prescribed or acknowledged by your doctor

 

POTENTIAL PROBLEMS

Permanent pacemaker insertion is a relatively safe procedure and serious complications are rare. The risk depends on your overall health and your individual heart condition – your doctor will not recommend the test if they don’t feel the benefits outweigh the small risk.

  • Blood clots
  • Surgical site infection (redness or discharge from wound)
  • Collapsed lung (may require intervention such as a chest drain)
  • Pacemaker malfunction (ICD can misfire)
  • Internal bleeding

 

SEEK URGENT MEDICAL ATTENTION OF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DEVELOP AFTER DISCHARGE:

  • Severe pain
  • Shortness of breath
  • Inflammation or redness at surgical site
  • Discharge from wound

Transoesophageal (TOE) Echocardiography

A trans-oesophageal echocardiogram (T.O.E.) is a heart scan that uses ultrasound (sound waves) to produce images of the heart. The scan is painless and does not use radioactivity. It involves swallowing a soft flexible tube as the pictures are taken via the gullet (oesophagus).A T.O.E. is often used to look carefully at the valves and the structure of the heart.

 

SEDATION

If you are having a TOE you will be given intravenous sedation for the procedure. 

The sedation is given through a cannula (small plastic tube) placed in the vein. You will feel sleepy and relaxed following the sedation but you will not be unconscious (this is not a general anaesthetic).

If you have sedation

  • You must have someone to accompany you home and remain with you for 12 hours
  • You must not drive or operate machinery for 24 hours
  • You must not consume alcohol for 24 hours
  • You should not make any vital decisions or sign any legal documents for 24 hours
  • You should not take any medication not prescribed or acknowledged by your doctor

 

POTENTIAL PROBLEMS

  • Throat discomfort
  • Damage or tear to oesophagus
  • Bleeding
  • Infection in the lining of the heart
  • Stroke

 

 

SEEK URGENT MEDICAL ATTENTION OF ANY OF THE FOLLOWING DEVELOP AFTER DISCHARGE:

  • Rapid heart rate or palpitations
  • Dizziness or passing out
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Numbness or weakness in the arm or leg
  • Difficulty with speech.

 

Consultants

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Dr Brendan Doyle

Consultant Cardiologist Cardiology,Interventional Cardiovascular Suite Cardiology

Bon Secours Dublin

P:01 697 8589

F:01 684 8930

Dr Brendan Doyle

Consultant Cardiologist

Biography

Dr Doyle joined the Consultant staff in the Bon Secours in 2016.  He previously served as a Consultant Cardiologist and a Professor of Medicine at the Mayo Clinic in the United States (2004-2010). His special interest is in the treatment of coronary artery disease, complex coronary stenting and percutaneous treatment of chronic total coronary occlusion.

Areas of Interest

Interventional Cardiology,General Cardiology,Cronic Total Occlusion, PCI, Rotablation, Complex PCI (Percutaneous Coronary Intervention)

Qualifications

M.D. M.R.C.P.I.

Contact Details

  • Dr Brendan Doyle
  • Bon Secours Hospital Dublin, Glasnevin, Dublin 9

Secretary

Dr. Thomas Gumbrielle

Consultant Cardiologist Cardiology,Interventional Cardiovascular Suite Cardiology

Bon Secours Dublin

P:01 8360332

Dr. Thomas Gumbrielle

Consultant Cardiologist

Biography

Areas of Interest

Interventional cardiology with particular interest in coronary angioplasty and stenting, cardiac pacing, defibrillator implants.

Qualifications

LRCP & SI, MB BCh NUI, MD NUI

Contact Details

  • Dr. Thomas Gumbrielle
  • Bon Secours Consultants Clinic, Glasnevin, Dublin 9

Secretary

Session Times

Bon Secours Consultants Clinic - Monday 1pm – 3pm, Beaumont Private Clinic – Wednesday 2pm – 5pm

Dr Angela Brown

Consultant Cardiologist Interventional Cardiovascular Suite,Cardiology Cardiology

Bon Secours Dublin

P:087 9004766

Dr Angela Brown

Consultant Cardiologist

Biography

Areas of Interest

General Cardiology, Valvular Heart Disease, Ischaemic Heart Disease, Cardiac Imaging

Qualifications

BSc., M.B., B.Chir., M.R.C.P., M.D. (Cambridge), F.R.C.P.I.

Contact Details

  • Dr Angela Brown
  • Bon Secours Consultants Clinic Dublin 9

Secretary

Session Times

Monday pm

Prof Brendan Mc Adam

Consultant Cardiologist Cardiology,Interventional Cardiovascular Suite Cardiology

Bon Secours Dublin

P:01 8573721

Prof Brendan Mc Adam

Consultant Cardiologist

Biography

Areas of Interest

Cardiac Imaging, Heart Failure, Lipid Disorders, Hypertension, Thrombosis and Vascular Disorders

Qualifications

M.D., F.R.C.P.I, F.A.H.A.

Contact Details

  • Prof Brendan Mc Adam
  • Beaumont Consultants Clinic, Beaumont Hospital, Dublin 9

Secretary

Mr. Peter Naughton

Consultant Vascular Surgeon Vascular Surgery,Interventional Cardiovascular Suite,Cavan Consultants Clinic Vascular Surgery

Mr. Peter Naughton

Consultant Vascular Surgeon

Biography

Mr Peter Naughton has worked as a Consultant Vascular and Endovascular Surgeon in Beaumont since 2011 and as a Senior Lecturer with RCSI. He is a graduate of  RCSI and completed his basic and higher surgical training in Dublin followed by a one year fellowship in St Mary’s Hospital, London and a 2 year endovascular fellowship in North Western Memorial Hospital, Chicago. He joined the Vascular Surgical team in the Bon Secours Hospital in Dublin in 2014.

Peter is a member of the American Venous Forum, Irish Society of Vascular Surgery and the European Society of Vascular Surgery

Peter has a specialist interest in both open and endovascular treatment for venous, peripheral vascular and aneurysmal disease

Areas of Interest

Open and endovascular treatment for venous, peripheral vascular and aneurysmal disease

Contact Details

  • Mr. Peter Naughton
  • Bon Secours Consultants Clinic, Glasnevin, Dublin 9

Secretary

Dr Mark Given

Consultant Radiologist Diagnostic Imaging,Interventional Cardiovascular Suite Radiology

Dr Mark Given

Consultant Radiologist

Biography

Qualifications

AFR, RCSI, FFR, FRAMZCR

Contact Details

  • Dr Mark Given
  • Beaumont Private Clinic, Beaumont, Dublin 9

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